National Center for Health Statistics: Vision Testing Among Children Aged 3–5 Years in the United States, 2016–2017

25 November 2019
Source: National Center for Health Statistics

Key findings   Centres for Disease Control and Prevention logo

Data from the National Health Interview Survey

During 2016–2017, 63.5% of children aged 3–5 years had ever had their vision tested by a doctor or other health professional.

Hispanic children (58.6%) were less likely to have ever had their vision tested compared with non-Hispanic white children (65.4%).

Receipt of a vision test increased with increasing parental educational attainment.

Children with private health insurance (66.7%) were more likely than both children with public coverage (61.2%) and uninsured children (43.3%) to have ever had a vision test.

Children who did not receive a well-child visit in the past 12 months were less likely to have ever had a vision test compared with children that did receive a well-child visit in the past 12 months.

Childhood vision screenings may provide early detection of vision disorders and opportunities for subsequent treatment. The United States Preventive Service Task Force recommends that children aged 3–5 years receive a vision screening at least once to detect amblyopia (lazy eye), or its risk factors. This report examines the percentage of children aged 3–5 years who have ever had a vision test by selected characteristics using data from the vision supplement included in the 2016–2017 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

Read the full information on the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention Website

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